AVRO  Aircraft

The Avro 504 was a First World War biplane aircraft made by the Avro aircraft company and under licence by others.

AVRO 504 Biplane WW1

Design and development

First flown from Brooklands by Fred "Freddie" Raynham on 18 September 1913, powered by an 80 hp (60 kW) Gnome Lambda seven-cylinder rotary engine, the Avro 504 was a development of the earlier Avro 500, designed for training and private flying. It was a two-bay all-wooden biplane with a square-section fuselage.

 

Operational history

Small numbers of early aircraft were purchased by the Royal Flying Corps (RFC) and the Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS) prior to the start of the First World War, and were taken to France when the war started. One of the RFC aircraft was the first British aircraft to be shot down by the Germans, on 22 August 1914. The pilot was 2nd Lt. Vincent Waterfall and his navigator Lt Charles George Gordon Bayly (both of 5 Sqn RFC) The RNAS used four 504s to form a special flight in order to bomb the Zeppelin works at Friedrichshafen on the shores of Lake Constance. Three set out from Belfort in north-eastern France on 21 November 1914, carrying four 20 lb (9 kg) bombs each. While one aircraft was shot down, the raid was successful, with several direct hits on the airship sheds and the destruction of the hydrogen generating plant.

 

Soon obsolete as a frontline aircraft, it came into its own as a trainer, with thousands being built during the war, with the major production types being the 504J and the mass production 504K, designed with modified engine bearers to accommodate a range of engines in order to cope with engine shortages. 8,340 Avro 504s had been produced by the end of 1918.

 

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AVRO 504 Biplane WW1

The Avro 504 was a First World War biplane aircraft made by the Avro aircraft company and under licence by others. Production during the war totalled 8,970 and continued for almost 20 years, making it the most-produced aircraft of any kind that served in the First World War, in any military capacity, during that conflict. More than 10,000 were built from 1913 until production ended in 1940

  • History

    Role Trainer, Fighter, Bomber

    Manufacturer Avro

    First flight 18 September 1913

    Introduction 1913

    Retired 1934

    Primary users Royal Flying Corps

    Royal Naval Air Service

    Produced 1913–1932

    Number built 8970 (during World War I)

  • Primary Users

    Crew: two

    Length: 29 ft 5 in (8.97 m)

    Wingspan: 36 ft (10.97 m)

    Height: 10 ft 5 in (3.18 m)
    Useful load: 180 lb (82 kg)

    Max. takeoff weight: 1,829 lb (830 kg)

    Powerplant: 1 × Le Rhône 9J Rotary, 110 hp (82 kW)

  • General Info

    Performance

    Maximum speed: 90 mph (145 km/h)

    Cruise speed: 75 mph (121 km/h)

    Range: 250 mi (402 km)

    Service ceiling: 16,000 ft (4,876 m)
    Armament

    1 fixed .303 Lewis atop upper wing (single-seat night fighter variants)

You are definitely intrigued to discover AVRO 504 Biplane.

Following the end of the war, while the type continued in service as the standard trainer of the RAF, large numbers of surplus aircraft were available for sale, both for civil and military use. More than 300 504Ks were placed on the civil register in Britain. Used for training, pleasure flying, banner towing and even barnstorming exhibitions (as was ongoing in North America following World War I with the similar-role, surplus Curtiss JN-4s and Standard J-1s); civil 504s continued flying in large numbers until well into the 1930s.

AVRO 504 Biplane WW1

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Production during the war totalled 8,970 and continued for almost 20 years, making it the most-produced aircraft of any kind that served in the First World War.

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