The Boeing CH-47 Chinook is an American twin-engined, tandem rotor, heavy-lift helicopter
developed by American rotorcraft company Vertol and manufactured by Boeing Vertol

Boeing CH-47D Chinook "1961"

Role Transport helicopter
National origin United States
Manufacturer Boeing Defense, Space & Security
First flight 21 September 1961
Introduction 1962
Status In service
Primary users United States Army
Japan Ground Self-Defense Force / Indian Air Force
Produced 1962–present
Number built Over 1,200 as of 2012
Developed from Vertol Model 107
Variants Boeing Chinook (UK variants)

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Boeing CH-47D Chinook
"1961"

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Boeing CH-47D Chinook
"1961"

The Boeing CH-47 Chinook is an American twin-engined, tandem rotor, heavy-lift helicopter developed by American rotorcraft company Vertol and manufactured by Boeing Vertol (later renamed Boeing Helicopter and now named Boeing Rotorcraft Systems). The CH-47 is among the heaviest lifting Western helicopters. Its name, Chinook, is from the Native American Chinook people of Washington state.

The Chinook was originally designed by Vertol, which had begun work in 1957 on a new tandem-rotor helicopter, designated as the Vertol Model 107 or V-107. Around the same time, the United States Department of the Army announced its intention to replace the piston engine-powered Sikorsky CH-37 Mojave with a new, gas turbine-powered helicopter. During June 1958, the U.S. Army ordered a small number of V-107s from Vertol under the YHC-1A designation; following testing, it came to be considered by some Army officials to be too heavy for the assault missions and too light for transport purposes

Design

During late 1956, the United States Department of the Army announced its intention to replace the Sikorsky CH-37 Mojave, which was powered by piston engines, with a new, gas turbine-powered helicopter.[2] Turbine engines were also a key design feature of the smaller UH-1 “Huey” utility helicopter. Following a design competition, in September 1958, a joint Army–Air Force source selection board recommended that the Army procure the Vertol-built medium transport helicopter. However, funding for full-scale development was not then available, and the Army vacillated on its design requirements. Some officials in Army Aviation thought that the new helicopter should be operated as a light tactical transport aimed at taking over the missions of the old piston-engined Piasecki H-21 and Sikorsky H-34 helicopters, and be consequently capable of carrying about 15 troops (one squad). Another faction in Army Aviation thought that the new helicopter should be much larger, enabling it to airlift large artillery pieces and possess enough internal space to carry the new MGM-31 “Pershing” missile system

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Boeing CH-47 Chinook (1961)

In 1969, work on the experimental Model 347 was begun. It was a CH-47A with a lengthened fuselage, four-blade rotors, detachable wings mounted on top of the fuselage and other changes. It first flew on 27 May 1970 and was evaluated for a few years.[116]

In 1973, the Army contracted with Boeing to design a “Heavy Lift Helicopter” (HLH), designated XCH-62A. It appeared to be a scaled-up CH-47 without a conventional body, in a configuration similar to the S-64 Skycrane (CH-54 Tarhe), but the project was canceled in 1975. The program was restarted for test flights in the 1980s and was again not funded by Congress.[116] The scaled-up model of the HLH was scrapped in late 2005 at Fort Rucker, Alabama.

Specifications

  • Crew: 3 (pilot, copilot, flight engineer or loadmaster)
  • Capacity: 33–55 troops or24 stretchers and 3 attendants or24,000 lb (10,886 kg) payload
  • Length: 98 ft (30 m)
  • Fuselage length: 52 ft (16 m)
  • Width: 12 ft 5 in (3.78 m) (fuselage)
  • Height: 18 ft 11 in (5.77 m)
  • Empty weight: 24,578 lb (11,148 kg)
  • Max takeoff weight: 50,000 lb (22,680 kg)
  • Powerplant: 2 × Lycoming T55-GA-714A turboshaft engines, 4,733 shp (3,529 kW) each
  • Maximum speed: 170 kn (196 mph, 315 km/h)
  • Cruise speed: 160 kn (184 mph, 296 km/h)
  • Range: 400 nmi (460 mi, 740 km)
  • Combat range: 200 nmi (230 mi, 370 km)
  • Ferry range: 1,216 nmi (1,399 mi, 2,252 km) [162]
  • Service ceiling: 20,000 ft (6,100 m)
  • Rate of climb: 1,522 ft/min (7.73 m/s)
  • Disk loading: 9.5 lb/sq ft (46 kg/m2)
  • Power/mass: 0.28 hp/lb (0.46 kW/kg)

Armament

Rockwell Collins Common Avionics Architecture System (CAAS) (MH-47G/CH-47F)Up to 3 pintle-mounted medium machine guns (1 on loading ramp and 2 at shoulder windows), generally 7.62 mm (0.300 in) M240/FN MAG machine guns, and can be armed with the 7.62 mm M134 Minigun rotary machine gun.

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srael On 22 April 2013, an agreement was signed to sell six V-22 to the Israeli Air Force.[210] By the end of 2016, Israel had not ordered the V-22 and was instead interested in buying the C-47 Chinook helicopter or the CH-53K helicopter.[211] As of 2017, Israel had frozen its evaluation of the V-22, "with a senior defence source indicating that the tiltrotor is unable to perform some missions currently conducted using its Sikorsky CH-53 transport helicopters