The Curtiss Robin, introduced in 1928, was a high-wing monoplane
built by the Curtiss-Robertson Airplane Manufacturing Company.

Curtiss OX-5 Robin "1929"

RoleTouring
ManufacturerCurtiss-Robertson Airplane Manufacturing Company
First flight7 August 1928
Introduction1928
StatusA number still flying
Primary userU. S. Private Owner Market
Number built769




Curtiss Aircraft

Curtiss OX-5 Robin
"1929"

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Curtiss OX-5 Robin
"1929"

The Curtiss Robin, introduced in 1928, was a high-wing monoplane built by the Curtiss-Robertson Airplane Manufacturing Company. The J-1 version was flown by Wrongway Corrigan who crossed the Atlantic after being refused permission.

Design

The Robin, a workmanlike cabin monoplane, had a wooden wing and steel tubing fuselage. The cabin accommodated three persons; two passengers were seated side-by-side behind the pilot. Early Robins were distinguished by large flat fairings over the parallel diagonal wing bracing struts; the fairings were abandoned on later versions, having been found to be ineffective in creating lift.[1] The original landing gear had bungee rubber cord shock absorbers, later replaced by an oleo-pneumatic system; a number of Robins had twin floats added.[2] Variants of the Robin were fitted with engines which developed 90–185 hp (67–138 kW).

Operational history

A single modified Robin (with a 110 hp (82 kW) Warner R-420-1) was used by the United States Army Air Corps, and designated the XC-10. This aircraft was used in a test program for radio-controlled (and unmanned) flight.[2]

Cuba’s national airline, Compañía Nacional Cubana de Aviación Curtiss, was founded in 1929 with the Curtiss-Wright company serving as its co-founder and major investor. The airline’s first aircraft was a Curtiss Robin and it was flown on domestic routes as a mail and passenger transport.

From September 1929 to May 1930 a Robin C-1 was used to deliver the McCook, Nebraska Daily Gazette to communities in rural Nebraska and Kansas. The airplane flew a nonstop route of 380 miles (610 km) daily, dropping bundles of newspapers from a height of 500 feet (150 m) to local carriers.[3]

A Curtiss Robin C was purchased by the Paraguayan government in 1932 for the transport squadron of its air arm. It was intensively used as a VIP transport plane and air ambulance during the Chaco War (1923–1935).

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Curtiss OX-5 Robin "1929"

Challenger Robin
(Model 50A) An early version of the Robin, powered by a 165 hp (123 kW) Curtiss Challenger radial piston engine.
Comet Robin
One Robin was converted by its owner in 1937, fitted with a 150 hp (110 kW) Comet 7-D radial piston engine.
Robin
(Model 50A) Prototypes and initial production aircraft powered by 90 hp (67 kW) Curtiss OX-5 engines.
Robin B
A three-seat cabin monoplane, fitted with wheel brakes and a steerable tailwheel, powered by a 90 hp (67 kW) Curtiss OX-5 V-8 engine; about 325 were built.
Robin C-1

Specifications

  • Crew: 1
  • Capacity: 2 pax / 425 lb (193 kg) payload
  • Length: 25 ft 9 in (7.85 m)
  • Wingspan: 41 ft 0 in (12.5 m)
  • Height: 7 ft 10 in (2.4 m)
  • Empty weight: 1,475 lb (669 kg)
  • Max takeoff weight: 2,175 lb (987 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Curtiss OX-5 V-8 water-cooled piston engine, 90 hp  
  • Maximum speed: 99.7 mph (160.5 km/h, 86.6 kn)
  • Cruise speed: 85 mph (137 km/h, 74 kn)
  • Landing speed: 45 mph (39 kn; 72 km/h)
  • Range: 785 mi (1,263 km, 682 nmi) cruising; 580 mi (500 nmi; 930 km) at full throttle
  • Service ceiling: 12,500 ft (3,800 m)
  • Rate of climb: 450 ft/min (2.3 m/s)
  • Time to altitude: 3,800 ft (1,200 m) in 10 minutes 

Aircrafttoaal encyclopedia

The Curtiss Robin, introduced in 1928, was a high-wing monoplane
built by the Curtiss-Robertson Airplane Manufacturing Company.