Aircrafttotaal

Curtiss JN-4 Jenny "1915"

The Curtiss JN-4 "Jenny" was one of a series of "JN" biplanes built by the Curtiss Aeroplane Company of Hammondsport, New York, later the Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor Company. Although the Curtiss JN series was originally produced as a training aircraft for the US Army, the "Jenny"

Curtiss JN-4 "Jenny" "1915"

Role Trainer
Manufacturer Curtiss
Designer Benjamin D. Thomas
Introduction 1915
Primary users U.S. Army Air Service
Royal Flying Corps
Number built 6,813
Variants Curtiss N-9 / Curtiss JN-6H

Curtiss & Wright / Travel Air

Curtiss: Commercial

Wright Flyer 1903Curtiss JN-4 Jenny 
Curtiss F9C Sparrowhawk – Curtiss P-36 Mohawk –  Curtiss P-40 Kittyhawk –
Curtiss C-46 Commando – Curtiss Wright C-12W – Curtiss SB2C Helldiver


Travel Air

Travel Air 2000, originally model BH – Travel Air 4000, originally model BW –
Travel Air 6000, cabin monoplane –  Travel Air Mystery Ship

Curtiss

Curtiss
JN-4 "Jenny""1915"

Clicke here for Curtiss Aircraft

Curtiss
JN-4 "Jenny""1915"

The Curtiss JN-4 “Jenny” was one of a series of “JN” biplanes built by the Curtiss Aeroplane Company of Hammondsport, New York, later the Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor Company. Although the Curtiss JN series was originally produced as a training aircraft for the US Army, the “Jenny” (the common nickname derived from “JN”) continued after World War I as a civil aircraft, as it became the “backbone of American postwar [civil] aviation.”

Thousands of surplus Jennys were sold at bargain prices to private owners in the years after the war and became central to the barnstorming era that helped awaken the US to civil aviation through much of the 1920s.

Design

 

Curtiss combined the best features of the model J and model N trainers, built for the US Army and US Navy, and began producing the JN or “Jenny” series of aircraft in 1915.[3] Curtiss built only a limited number of the JN-1 and JN-2 biplanes. The design was commissioned by Glenn Curtiss from Englishman Benjamin Douglas Thomas, formerly of the Sopwith Aviation Company.[4]

The JN-2 was an equal-span biplane with ailerons controlled by a shoulder yoke in the aft cockpit.[5] It was deficient in performance, particularly climbing, because of excessive weight. The improved JN-3 incorporated unequal spans with ailerons only on the upper wings, controlled by a wheel. In addition, a foot bar was added to control the rudder.

You are definitely intrigued to discover

Stinson 108 Voyager (1944)

In a series of tests conducted at the US Army’s Langley Field in Hampton, Virginia, in July and August 1917, the world’s first “plane-to-plane” and “ground-to-plane, and vice versa” communications by radiotelephony (as opposed to radiotelegraphy which had been developed earlier) were made to and from modified US Army JN-4s[N 5] by Western Electric Company (Bell Labs) design engineers Lewis M. Clement and Raymond Heising, the developers of the experimental wind generator-powered airborne wireless voice transmitter and receiver equipment

Specifications

  • Crew: 2
  • Length: 27 ft 4 in (8.33 m)
  • Wingspan: 43 ft 7.375 in (13.29373 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 10.625 in (3.01308 m)
  • Empty weight: 1,390 lb (630 kg)
  • Gross weight: 1,920 lb (871 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Curtiss OX-5 V-8 air-cooled piston engine, 90 hp (67 kW)
  • Maximum speed: 75 mph (121 km/h, 65 kn)
  • Cruise speed: 60 mph (97 km/h, 52 kn)
  • Service ceiling: 6,500 ft (2,000 m)
  • Time to altitude: 2,000 ft (610 m) in 7 minutes 30 seconds

Ultimate encyclopedia

Aircrafttotaal

Between 1917 and 1919, the JN-4 type accounted for several significant aviation firsts while in service with the US Army Signal Corps Aviation Section and the United States Marine Corps (USMC) including flying the first US Air Mail in May 1918.

Copyright @2021 Aircrafttotaal