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Curtiss P-40 Warhawk "1938"

The Curtiss P-40 Warhawk is an American single-engined, single-seat, all-metal fighter and ground-attack aircraft that first flew in 1938. The P-40 design was a modification of the previous Curtiss P-36 Hawk which reduced development time and enabled a rapid entry into production and operational service.

Curtiss P-40 Warhawk "1938"

Role Fighter aircraft
National origin United States
Manufacturer Curtiss-Wright
First flight 14 October 1938
Retired Brazilian Air Force (1958)
Primary users United States Army Air Forces
Royal Air Force / Royal Australian Air Force / Royal Canadian Air Force
Produced 1939–1944
Number built 13,738
Developed from Curtiss P-36 Hawk
Variants Curtiss XP-46

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P-40 Warhawk"1938"

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Curtiss
P-40 Warhawk"1938"

The Curtiss P-40 Warhawk is an American single-engined, single-seat, all-metal fighter and ground-attack aircraft that first flew in 1938. The P-40 design was a modification of the previous Curtiss P-36 Hawk which reduced development time and enabled a rapid entry into production and operational service. The Warhawk was used by most Allied powers during World War II, and remained in frontline service until the end of the war. It was the third most-produced American fighter of World War II, after the P-51 and P-47; by November 1944, when production of the P-40 ceased, 13,738 had been built,[3] all at Curtiss-Wright Corporation‘s main production facilities at Buffalo, New York.

P-40 Warhawk was the name the United States Army Air Corps gave the plane, and after June 1941, the USAAF adopted the name for all models, making it the official name in the U.S. for all P-40s. The British Commonwealth and Soviet air forces used the name Tomahawk for models equivalent to the original P-40, P-40B, and P-40C, and the name Kittyhawk for models equivalent to the P-40D and all later variants.

Design

On 14 October 1938, Curtiss test pilot Edward Elliott flew the prototype XP-40 on its first flight in Buffalo.[11] The XP-40 was the 10th production Curtiss P-36 Hawk,[12] with its Pratt & Whitney R-1830 Twin Wasp 14-cylinder air-cooled radial engine replaced at the direction of Chief Engineer Don R. Berlin by a liquid-cooled, supercharged Allison V-1710 V-12 engine. The first prototype placed the glycol coolant radiator in an underbelly position on the fighter, just aft of the wing’s trailing edge.[13] USAAC Fighter Projects Officer Lieutenant Benjamin S. Kelsey flew this prototype some 300 miles in 57 minutes, approximately 315 miles per hour (507 km/h). Hiding his disappointment, he told reporters that future versions would likely go 100 miles per hour (160 km/h) faster.[14] Kelsey was interested in the Allison engine because it was sturdy and dependable, and it had a smooth, predictable power curve. The V-12 engine offered as much power as a radial engine but had a smaller frontal area and allowed a more streamlined cowl than an aircraft with a radial engine, promising a theoretical 5% increase in top speed

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Curtiss P-40 Warhawk (1938)

In a series of tests conducted at the US Army’s Langley Field in Hampton, Virginia, in July and August 1917, the world’s first “plane-to-plane” and “ground-to-plane, and vice versa” communications by radiotelephony (as opposed to radiotelegraphy which had been developed earlier) were made to and from modified US Army JN-4s[N 5] by Western Electric Company (Bell Labs) design engineers Lewis M. Clement and Raymond Heising, the developers of the experimental wind generator-powered airborne wireless voice transmitter and receiver equipment

Specifications

Crew: One

Length: 31 ft 8.5 in (9.665 m)

Wingspan: 37 ft 3.5 in (11.367 m)

Height: 10 ft 8 in (3.25 m)

Empty weight: 5,922 lb (2,686 kg)

Gross weight: 8,515 lb (3,862 kg)

Powerplant: 1 × Allison V-1710-39 V-12 liquid-cooled piston engine, 1,240 hp (920 kW)

Maximum speed: 334 mph (538 km/h, 290 kn) at 15,000 ft (4,600 m)

Cruise speed: 308 mph (496 km/h, 268 kn)

Range: 716 mi (1,152 km, 622 nmi) at 70% power

Service ceiling: 29,100 ft (8,900 m)

Time to altitude: 15,000 ft (4,600 m) in 6 minutes 15 seconds

Wing loading: 35.1 lb/sq ft (171 kg/m2)

Power/mass: 0.14 hp/lb (0.23 kW/kg)

  • Guns: 6 × 0.5 in (12.7 mm) M2 Browning machine guns in the wings
  • Bombs: 250 to 1,000 lb (110 to 450 kg) bombs to a total of 2,000 lb (910 kg) on hardpoints under the fuselage and two underwing

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The Curtiss P-40 Warhawk is an American single-engined, single-seat, all-metal fighter and ground-attack aircraft that first flew in 1938. The P-40 design was a modification of the previous Curtiss P-36 Hawk which reduced development time and enabled a rapid entry into production and operational service.

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