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Dassault Rafale "1986"

The Dassault Rafale in a more military sense is a French twin-engine, canard delta wing, multirole fighter aircraft designed and built by Dassault Aviation. Equipped with a wide range of weapons, the Rafale is intended to perform air supremacy, interdiction, aerial reconnaissance, ground support, in-depth strike, anti-ship strike and nuclear deterrence missions. The Rafale is referred to as an "omnirole" aircraft by Dassault.

Dassault Rafale "1986"

Role Multirole fighter
National origin France
Manufacturer Dassault Aviation
First flight Rafale A demo: 4 July 1986
Rafale C: 19 May 1991
Introduction 18 May 2001
Status In service
Primary users French Air and Space Force / French Navy
Egyptian Air Force / Qatar Air Force
Produced 1986–present
Number built 201 as of 2019

Dassault: Millitary / WW1 and WW2

Dassault: Millitary

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Dassault Rafale "1986"

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Dassault Rafale "1986"

The Dassault Rafale (French pronunciation: ​[ʁafal], literally meaning “gust of wind”,[8] and “burst of fire” in a more military sense)[9] is a French twin-engine, canard delta wing, multirole fighter aircraft designed and built by Dassault Aviation. Equipped with a wide range of weapons, the Rafale is intended to perform air supremacy, interdiction, aerial reconnaissance, ground support, in-depth strike, anti-ship strike and nuclear deterrence missions. The Rafale is referred to as an “omnirole” aircraft by Dassault.

In the late 1970s, the French Air Force and French Navy were seeking to replace and consolidate their current fleets of aircraft. In order to reduce development costs and boost prospective sales, France entered into an arrangement with the UK, Germany, Italy and Spain to produce an agile multi-purpose “Future European Fighter Aircraft” (what would become the Eurofighter Typhoon). Subsequent disagreements over workshare and differing requirements led to France’s pursuit of its own development programme. Dassault built a technology demonstrator which first flew in July 1986 as part of an eight-year flight-test programme, paving the way for the go-ahead of the project

Dassault Rafale Design

The Rafale was developed as a modern jet fighter with a very high level of agility; Dassault chose to combine a delta wing with active close-coupled canard to maximize manoeuvrability. The aircraft is capable of withstanding from −3.6g to 9g (10.5g on Rafale solo display and a maximum of 11g can be reached in case of emergency[62][63]). The Rafale is an aerodynamically unstable aircraft and uses digital fly-by-wire flight controls to artificially enforce and maintain stability.[63][N 2] The aircraft’s canards also act to reduce the minimum landing speed to 115 knots (213 km/h; 132 mph); while in flight, airspeeds as low as 15 knots (28 km/h; 17 mph) have been observed during training missions.[63] According to simulations by Dassault, the Rafale has sufficient low speed performance to operate from STOBAR-configured aircraft carriers, and can take off using a ski-jump with no modifications.[65]

The Rafale M features a greatly reinforced undercarriage to cope with the additional stresses of naval landings, an arrestor hook, and “jump strut” nosewheel, which only extends during short takeoffs, including catapult launches.[35] It also features a built-in ladder, carrier-based microwave landing system, and the new fin-tip Telemir system for syncing the inertial navigation system to external equipment.

 France
A total of 180 have been ordered out of a planned 286, with an option for another 9. Approximately 152 are confirmed to be delivered by 2018.[312][313] As of 2017, 149 had been delivered. In 2018 three Rafale will be delivered, and then in 2024 all the 28 remaining out of the 180 ordered will be delivered.
 Egypt
  • Egyptian Air Force – 54 ordered with 24 Rafale fighters delivered and in service as of December 2018.
 Greece

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Dassault Rafale (1986)

Although not a full-aspect stealth aircraft, the cost of which was viewed as unacceptably excessive, the Rafale was designed for a reduced radar cross-section (RCS) and infrared signature . In order to reduce the RCS, changes from the initial technology demonstrator include a reduction in the size of the tail-fin, fuselage reshaping, repositioning of the engine air inlets underneath the aircraft’s wing, and the extensive use of composite materials and serrated patterns for the construction of the trailing edges of the wings and canards. Seventy percent of the Rafale’s surface area is composite.[69] Many of the features designed to reduce the Rafale’s visibility to threats remain classified

Specifications

  • Crew: 1 or 2
  • Length: 15.27 m (50 ft 1 in)
  • Wingspan: 10.90 m (35 ft 9 in)
  • Height: 5.34 m (17 ft 6 in)
  • Empty weight: 10,300 kg (22,708 lb) (B)
  • Max takeoff weight: 24,500 kg (54,013 lb)
  • Powerplant: 2 × Snecma M88-4e turbofans, 50.04 kN (11,250 lbf) thrust each  dry, 75 kN (17,000 lbf) with afterburner

Maximum speed: 1,912 km/h (1,188 mph, 1,032 kn)  / Mach 1.8 at high altitude1,390 km/h, 860 mph, 750 kn / Mach 1.1 at low altitude
Supercruise: Mach 1.4
Combat range: 1,850 km (1,150 mi, 1,000 nmi) on penetration mission with three tanks (5,700 L), two SCALP-EG and two MICA AAMs.
Ferry range: 3,700 km (2,300 mi, 2,000 nmi) with 3 drop tanks
Service ceiling: 15,835 m (51,952 ft)
g limits: +9 −3.6 (+11 in emergencies)
Rate of climb: 304.8 m/s (60,000 ft/min)

Guns: 1× 30 mm (1.2 in) GIAT 30/M791 autocannon with 125 rounds

Hardpoints: 14 for Air Force versions (Rafale B/C), 13 for Navy version (Rafale M) with a capacity of 9,500 kg (20,900 lb) external fuel and ordnance,with provisions to carry combinations of:
Missiles: Air-to-air:Magic IIMBDA MICA IR or EMMBDA Meteor

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Notable accidents On 6 December 2007, a French Air Force twin-seat Rafale crashed during a training flight. The pilot, who suffered from spatial disorientation, was killed in the accident.[328] On 24 September 2009, after unarmed test flights, two French Navy Rafales returning to the aircraft carrier Charles de Gaulle, collided in mid-air about 30 kilometres (19 mi) from the town of Perpignan in southwest France. One test pilot, identified as François Duflot, was killed in the accident, while the other was rescued

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