douglas Aircraft

Douglas DC-3 Dakota

Douglas DC-3 Dakota

Transport Aircraft

Douglas Aircraft

The Douglas DC-3 is a propeller-driven airliner which had a lasting effect on the airline industry in the 1930s/1940s and World War II.

Douglas DC-3 Dakota

The Douglas DC-3 is a propeller-driven airliner which had a lasting effect on the airline industry in the 1930s/1940s and World War II. It was developed as a larger, improved 14-bed sleeper version of the Douglas DC-2. It is a low-wing metal monoplane with conventional landing gear, powered by two radial piston engines of 1,000–1,200 hp (750–890 kW). (Although most DC-3s flying today use Pratt & Whitney R-1830 Twin Wasp engines, many DC-3s built for civil service originally had the Wright R-1820 Cyclone.) The DC-3 has a cruise speed of 207 mph (333 km/h), a capacity of 21 to 32 passengers or 6,000 lbs (2,700 kg) of cargo, and a range of 1,500 mi (2,400 km), and can operate from short runways.

Design

“DC” stands for “Douglas Commercial”. The DC-3 was the culmination of a development effort that began after an inquiry from Transcontinental and Western Airlines (TWA) to Donald Douglas. TWA’s rival in transcontinental air service, United Airlines, was starting service with the Boeing 247 and Boeing refused to sell any 247s to other airlines until United’s order for 60 aircraft had been filled.[6] TWA asked Douglas to design and build an aircraft that would allow TWA to compete with United. Douglas’ design, the 1933 DC-1, was promising, and led to the DC-2 in 1934. The DC-2 was a success, but there was room for improvement.

Douglas Commercial

Douglas

RoleAirliner and transport aircraft
National originUnited States
ManufacturerDouglas Aircraft Company
First flightDecember 17, 1935
Introduction1936
StatusIn service
Produced1936–1942, 1950
Number built607[1]
Developed fromDouglas DC-2
VariantsDouglas C-47 Skytrain
Lisunov Li-2
Showa/Nakajima L2D
Basler BT-67
Conroy Turbo-Three
Conroy Tri-Turbo-Three

 

Development

Production

Total production including all military variants was 16,079.[11] More than 400 remained in commercial service in 1998. Production was as follows:

Specifications (DC-3) Data from The Great Book of Modern Warplanes,

General characteristics

  • Crew: two
  • Capacity: 21–32 passengers
  • Length: 64 ft 8 in (19.7 m)
  • Wingspan: 95 ft 2 in (29.0 m)
  • Height: 16 ft 11 in (5.16 m)
  • Wing area: 987 sq ft (91.7 m2)
  • Aspect ratio: 9.17
  • Airfoil: NACA2215 / NACA2206
  • Empty weight: 16,865 lb (7,650 kg)
  • Gross weight: 25,200 lb (11,431 kg)
  • Fuel capacity: 822 gal. (3736 l)
  • Powerplant: 2 × Pratt & Whitney R-1830-S1C3G Twin Wasp 14-cyl. air-cooled two row radial piston engine, 1,200 hp (890 kW) each
  • Propellers: 3-bladed Hamilton Standard 23E50 series, 11 ft 6 in (3.5 m) diameter hydraulically controlled constant speed, feathering

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 200 kn (230 mph, 370 km/h) at 8,500 ft (2,590 m)
  • Cruise speed: 180 kn (207 mph, 333 km/h)
  • Stall speed: 68.0 kn (78.2 mph, 125.9 km/h)
  • Range: 1,370 nmi (1,580 mi, 2,540 km) (maximum fuel, 3500 lb payload)
  • Service ceiling: 23,200 ft (7,100 m)
  • Rate of climb: 1,130 ft/min (5.7 m/s)
  • Wing loading: 25.5 lb/sq ft (125 kg/m2)
  • Power/mass: 0.0952 hp/lb (156.5 W/kg)

Aircrafttoaal encyclopedia

An air force, also known in some countries as an aerospace force or air army, is in the broadest sense, the national military branch that primarily conducts aerial warfare.