McDonnell / Douglas

Douglas
Douglas DC-4 Skymaster (1942)

Douglas DC-4 (Berlin Airlift) (1942)

McDonnell / Douglas

McDonnell/Douglas

The Douglas C-54 Skymaster is a four-engined transport aircraft used by the United States Army Air Forces.

Click here Douglas Transport

Douglas
DC-4 Berlin Airlift

The Douglas DC-4 is a four-engine (piston) propeller-driven airliner developed by the Douglas Aircraft Company. Military versions of the plane, the C-54 and R5D, served during World War II, in the Berlin Airlift and into the 1960s. From 1945, many civil airlines operated the DC-4 worldwide.

Design DC-4

Following proving flights by United Airlines of the DC-4E it became obvious that the 52-seat airliner was too large to operate economically and the partner airlines[a] recommended a long list of changes required to the design. Douglas took the new requirement and produced a new design, the DC-4A, with a simpler unpressurised fuselage, R-2000 Twin Wasp engines and a single fin and rudder. Both designs included tricycle landing gear, unlike the

predecessor 2-engine DC-3.

Douglas

Douglas DC-4

Role Airliner/transport aircraft
National origin United States
Manufacturer Douglas Aircraft Company
First flight 14 February 1942 (production series)
Introduction 1942 with United Airlines
Retired 1991
Status In very limited use
Produced 1942 – August 1947
Number built 80 DC-4 and 1,163 C-54/R5D
Variants C-54 Skymaster
Canadair North Star
Aviation Traders ATL-98 Carvair
Developed into Douglas DC-6

Operators

Variants

DC-4
Main production airliner, postwar.
Canadair North Star
Canadian production of a Rolls-Royce Merlin powered variant, plus a single example powered with Pratt & Whitney R-2800s.
Aviation Traders Carvair
British cargo and car ferry with a modified nose with a raised cockpit to allow cars to be loaded more easily.

You are definitely intrigued to discover

Douglas DC-4 Skymaster (1942)

A 1944-built DC-4 is currently[when?] being restored in New South Wales, Australia.[12] Buffalo Airways in Canada’s Northwest Territories owns eleven DC-4s (former C-54s of various versions); four for hauling cargo and three for aerial firefighting.[13] A 1945-built DC-4 (C-54E) c/n 27370 is currently operating as a flying museum of the Berlin Airlift. Called the “Spirit of Freedom”, it has been touring the world for nearly 20 years.[14] Alaska Air Fuel[15] also operates two DC4s out of Palmer, Alaska, United States. One ex-Buffalo DC4[16] (N55CW c/n 10673, currently registered to AIRCRAFT GUARANTY CORP TRUSTEE) is fitted with spray bars on top of the wings and is currently based in Florida on standby for oil pollution control.

Specifications

General characteristics

  • Crew: 4
  • Capacity: day transport: 44 pax with baggage and freight; sleeper transport : 22 pax with baggage and freight later, up to 86 in high density seating
  • Length: 93 ft 10 in (28.60 m)
  • Wingspan: 117 ft 6 in (35.81 m)
  • Height: 27 ft 6 in (8.38 m)
  • Empty weight: 43,300 lb (19,641 kg)
  • Gross weight: 63,500 lb (28,803 kg)
  • Max takeoff weight: 73,000 lb (33,112 kg)
  • Powerplant: 4 × Pratt & Whitney R-2000-2SD13-G Twin Wasp 14-cylinder air-cooled radial piston engines, 1,450 hp (1,080 kW)
      •  
  • Performance

    • Maximum speed: 280 mph (450 km/h, 240 kn) at 14,000 ft (4,300 m)
    • Cruise speed: 227 mph (365 km/h, 197 kn) 60% power at 10,000 ft (3,000 m)
    • Range: 3,300 mi (5,300 km, 2,900 nmi) at 10% above max L/D speed
    • Ferry range: 4,250 mi (6,840 km, 3,690 nmi) with inner wing fuel cells

Aircrafttoaal encyclopedia

The Douglas DC-4 is a four-engine (piston) propeller-driven airliner developed by the Douglas Aircraft Company. Military versions of the plane, the C-54 and R5D, served during World War II, in the Berlin Airlift and into the 1960s. From 1945, many civil airlines operated the DC-4 worldwide.