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McDonnell F3H Demon "1951"

The McDonnell F3H Demon is a subsonic swept-wing United States Navy carrier-based jet fighter aircraft. The successor to the F2H Banshee, the Demon was originally designed to use the Westinghouse J40 engine

McDonnell F3H Demon "1951"

RoleCarrier-based all-weather interceptor
ManufacturerMcDonnell Aircraft Corporation
First flight7 August 1951
Introduction7 March 1956
Retired1964
StatusRetired
Primary userUnited States Navy
Number built519

McDonnell/Douglas

The McDonnell F3H Demon is a subsonic swept-wing United States Navy carrier-based jet fighter aircraft.

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McDonnell"1951"
F3H Demon "1951"

The McDonnell F3H Demon is a subsonic swept-wing United States Navy carrier-based jet fighter aircraft. The successor to the F2H Banshee, the Demon was originally designed to use the Westinghouse J40 engine, but had to be redesigned to accept the Allison J71 after the J40 suffered severe problems and was ultimately abandoned.[1] Though it lacked sufficient power for supersonic performance, it complemented daylight dogfighters such as the Vought F8U Crusader and Grumman F11F Tiger as an all-weather, missile-armed interceptor[2] until 1964.

Operational History

Development work began in 1949, using a swept wing from the start rather than adapting a straight-winged design as was done with the Grumman F9F Panther. A competing contract was also awarded for the delta wing Douglas F4D Skyray. The Skyray, with a top speed of 722 mph (1,162 km/h), would become the Navy’s first fighter to fly supersonic in level flight, while the Demon would never reach that level of performance. The original design work was based at its predecessor, the F2H Banshee. However, departing from its tradition of using two engines, the Demon would result in McDonnell’s only single-engined carrier-based fighter, adopting under some Navy pressure, the Westinghouse J40 engine. That engine was being promoted by the Navy for its next generation of aircraft, and was to have thrust of over 11,000 lbf (49 kN)—three times that of the engines in the F2H Banshee. It was the first swept-wing design produced by McDonnell and among the first U.S. aircraft to have missile armament.

 United States
 
McDonnell F3H-2 Demon at the Pima Air Museum in 2015
F3H-2M
F3H-2N

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McDonnell F3H Demon (1951) Variants

 
F-3Bs of VF-13 in 1963
 
XF3H-1
Prototype single-seat clear-weather interceptor fighter. Powered by 6,500 lbf (29 kN) (9,200 lbf (41 kN) with afterburner) Westinghouse XJ40-WE-6 engine. Two built.
F3H-1N
Initial production version. Single-seat all-weather fighter version, powered by 7,200 lbf (32 kN) (10,900 lbf (48 kN) with afterburner) J40-WE-22 engine. 58 built.
F3H
Proposed reconnaissance version of F3H-1. Never built.
F3H-2N
All-weather fighter powered by 9,500 lbf (42 kN) (14,250 lbf (63.4 kN) Allison J71-A-2 engine and equipped to carry AIM-9 Sidewinder air-to-air missiles. 239 built. Redesignated F-3C in 1962.

Specifications

Crew: 1

Length: 59 ft (18 m)

Wingspan: 35 ft 4 in (10.77 m)

Height: 14 ft 7 in (4.45 m)

Empty weight: 21,133 lb (9,586 kg)

Gross weight: 33,900 lb (15,377 kg)

Powerplant: 1 × Allison J71-A-2E afterburning turbojet engine, 9,700 lbf (43 kN) thrust dry, 14,750 lbf (65.6 kN) with afterburner

Maximum speed: 716 mph (1,152 km/h, 622 kn) at sea level 647 mph (562 kn; 1,041 km/h) at 30,000 ft (9,144 m)
Range: 1,370 mi (2,200 km, 1,190 nmi)
Endurance: 3 hours at 575 mi (500 nmi; 925 km) radius
Service ceiling: 35,050 ft (10,680 m)
Rate of climb: 12,795 ft/min (65.00 m/s)

Avionics

  • AN/APG-51A, B, and C radar

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