Lockheed Millitary

Lockheed Have Blue (1977)

Lockheed Have Blue (1977)

Boeing Millitaryl aircraft

Lockheed Millitary

Lockheed Have Blue (1977)

Click here for Lockheed Millitary aircraft

Lockheed Have Blue (1977)

Lockheed Have Blue was the code name for Lockheed‘s proof of concept demonstrator for a stealth bomber. Have Blue was designed by Lockheed’s Skunk Works division, and tested at Groom Lake, Nevada. The Have Blue was the first fixed-wing aircraft whose external shape was defined by radar engineering rather than by aerospace engineering. The aircraft’s faceted shape was designed to deflect electromagnetic waves in directions other than that of the originating radar emitter, greatly reducing its radar cross-section.

Operational History

The Lockheed Have Blue was born out of a requirement to evade radar detection. During the Vietnam War, radar-guided surface-to-air missiles (SAM) and anti-aircraft artillery (AAA) posed a significant threat to US aircraft. As such, strike aircraft during the war often required support aircraft to perform combat air patrols and suppression of enemy air defenses (SEAD).[3] The 1973 Yom Kippur War again highlighted the vulnerability of aircraft to SAMs – the Israeli Air Force lost 109 aircraft in 18 days.[3] During the Cold War, the Soviet Union developed an integrated defense network, central to which were medium- to long-range surveillance radars. SAMs and AAAs would be set up around key locations to defend them from incoming enemy aircraft.[3] If the loss ratio of Israel during the Yom Kippur War was experienced by NATO forces during a military confrontation with the Warsaw Pact, NATO aircraft numbers would be depleted within two weeks

Lockheed

Lockheed Have Blue (1977)

Role Stealth demonstrator
Manufacturer Lockheed Skunk Works
First flight 1 December 1977
Status Destroyed
Primary user Lockheed
Number built 2
Developed into Lockheed F-117A Nighthawk

Related

You are definitely intrigued to discover

Lockheed Have Blue (1977)

In the 1970s, it became increasingly apparent to U.S. planners that, in a military confrontation with Warsaw Pact forces, NATO aircraft would quickly suffer heavy losses. This came as a result of sophisticated Soviet defense networks, which used surveillance radars, radar-guided surface-to-air missiles (SAM), and anti-aircraft artillery to seek and eliminate enemy aircraft. Consequently, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) started a study on low-observability aircraft, seeking to design and produce an operational stealth aircraft. Five companies were initially invited, three of which bowed out early. The remaining two were later joined by Lockheed.

Specifications

  • Crew: 1
  • Length: 47 ft 3 in (14.40 m)
  • Wingspan: 22 ft 6 in (6.86 m)
  • Height: 7 ft 6 in (2.29 m)
  • Wing area: 386 sq ft (35.9 m2)
  • Empty weight: 8,950 lb (4,060 kg)
  • Max takeoff weight: 12,500 lb (5,670 kg)
  • Powerplant: 2 × General Electric J85-GE-4A turbojet engines, 2,950 lbf (13.1 kN) thrust each
  •  
  • Maximum speed: 521 kn (600 mph, 965 km/h)
  • Wing loading: 32 lb/sq ft (160 kg/m2)
  • Thrust/weight: 0.46–0.62

Aircrafttotaal
Ultimate encyclopedia

Aircrafttotaal

HB1001 made its first flight on 1 December 1977 at the hands of Lockheed test pilot, Bill Park. He would fly the next four sorties, all chased by a T-38 piloted by Major (later Lieutenant Colonel) Ken Dyson. Dyson, an F-15 Eagle pilot, was previously approached by United States Air Force personnel about the project in 1976.[21] He made his first flight on HB1001 on 17 January 1978, chased by Park. In fact, the two would be the only test pilots of Have Blue, alternating between the demonstrator and the chase plane. Flight test results allowed engineers to refine the FBW system. At the same time, they verified predictions made earlier by aerodynamic engineers on the aircraft's behavior

Copyright @2021 Aircrafttotaal