The last operator of the T-33, the Bolivian Air Force, retired the type in July 2017, after 44 years of service.

Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star "1948"

Role Training aircraft
Manufacturer Lockheed
Designer Clarence “Kelly” Johnson
First flight 22 March 1948
Retired 31 July 2017 (Bolivian Air Force)
Primary users United States Air Force / United States Navy / Japan Air Self Defense Force
German Air Force / Produced 1948–1959
Number built 6,557
Developed from Lockheed P-80 Shooting Star
Variants Lockheed T2V SeaStar
Canadair CT-133 Silver Star
Developed into Lockheed F-94 Starfire Boeing Skyfox



Lockheed-Martin Aircraft

Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star
(or T-Bird)
is a subsonic American jet trainer.

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Lockheed
T-33A T-bird

The Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star (or T-Bird) is a subsonic American jet trainer. It was produced by Lockheed and made its first flight in 1948. The T-33 was developed from the Lockheed P-80/F-80 starting as TP-80C/TF-80C in development, then designated T-33A. It was used by the U.S. Navy initially as TO-2, then TV-2, and after 1962, T-33B. The last operator of the T-33, the Bolivian Air Force, retired the type in July 2017, after 44 years of service.

Design

The T-33 was developed from the Lockheed P-80/F-80 by lengthening the fuselage by slightly more than 3 feet (1 m) and adding a second seat, instrumentation, and flight controls. It was initially designated as a variant of the P-80/F-80, the TP-80C/TF-80C.[2]

Design work on the Lockheed P-80 began in 1943, with the first flight on 8 January 1944. Following on the Bell P-59, the P-80 became the first jet fighter to enter full squadron service in the United States Army Air Forces. As more advanced jets entered service, the F-80 took on another role—training jet pilots. The two-place T-33 jet was designed for training pilots already qualified to fly propeller-driven aircraft.

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Lockheed T-33A Shooting star 1948)

A limited number of T-33s have been owned privately, with two used by Boeing as chase aircraft. In 2010, one T-33 owned by Boeing was used as a chase aircraft during the maiden flight of the Boeing 787.[6] The maiden flight of the Boeing 737 MAX-7 on 16 March 2018 also featured a T-33 chase plane.[7] The maiden flight of the Boeing 777-9 on January 25, 2020 also featured a T-33 chase plane, taking off from KBFI and meeting the 777-9 at KPAE, it stopped at KMWH and it took off again to chase the 777-9 on its way back to KBFI, flying around Mount Rainier before their landing

Specifications

Crew: 2

Length: 37 ft 9 in (11.51 m)

Wingspan: 38 ft 10.5 in (11.849 m)

Height: 11 ft 8 in (3.56 m)

Empty weight: 8,365 lb (3,794 kg)

Gross weight: 12,071 lb (5,475 kg)

Max takeoff weight: 15,061 lb (6,832 kg)

Powerplant: 1 × Allison J33-A-35 centrifugal flow turbojet engine, 5,400 lbf (24 kN) thrust for take-off with water injection

Maximum speed: 600 mph (970 km/h, 520 kn) at sea level

Cruise speed: 455 mph (732 km/h, 395 kn)

Range: 1,275 mi (2,052 km, 1,108 nmi)

Service ceiling: 48,000 ft (15,000 m)

Rate of climb: 4,870 ft/min (24.7 m/s)

Armament

Hardpoints: 2 with a capacity of 2,000 lb (907 kg) of bombs or rockets
(AT-33),

Aircrafttoaal encyclopedia

Some T-33s retained two machine guns for gunnery training, and in some countries, the T-33 was even used in combat: the Cuban Air Force used them during the Bay of Pigs Invasion, scoring several kills including sinking two transport ships. The RT-33A version, reconnaissance aircraft produced primarily for use by foreign countries, had a camera installed in the nose and additional equipment in the rear cockpit.