North American Aircraft

North American
B-25 Mitchell

North American B-25 Mitchell

Fighter Aircraft WW2

North American Aircraft

The North American B-25 Mitchell is a medium bomber that was introduced in 1941 and named in honor of Major General William "Billy" Mitchell, a pioneer of U.S. military aviation

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North American
B-25 Mitchell

The North American B-25 Mitchell is a medium bomber that was introduced in 1941 and named in honor of Major General William “Billy” Mitchell, a pioneer of U.S. military aviation.[2] Used by many Allied air forces, the B-25 served in every theater of World War II, and after the war ended, many remained in service, operating across four decades. Produced in numerous variants, nearly 10,000 B-25s were built.[1] These included several limited models such as the F-10 reconnaissance aircraft, the AT-24 crew trainers, and the United States Marine Corps‘ PBJ-1 patrol bomber.

Design

The majority of B-25s in American service were used in the war against Japan in Asia and the Pacific. The Mitchell fought from the Northern Pacific to the South Pacific and the Far East. These areas included the campaigns in the Aleutian Islands, Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, New Britain, China, Burma and the island hopping campaign in the Central Pacific. The aircraft’s potential as a ground-attack aircraft emerged during the Pacific war. The jungle environment reduced the usefulness of medium-level bombing, and made low-level attack the best tactic. Using similar mast height level tactics and skip bombing, the B-25 proved itself to be a capable anti-shipping weapon and sank many enemy sea vessels of various types. An ever-increasing number of forward firing guns made the B-25 a formidable strafing aircraft for island warfare

North American

North American

RoleMedium bomber
National originUnited States
ManufacturerNorth American Aviation
First flight19 August 1940
Introduction1941
Retired1979 (Indonesia)
Primary usersUnited States Army Air Forces
Royal Air Force
Soviet Air Force
United States Marine Corps
Number built9,816[1][a]
Developed fromNorth American NA-40
Developed intoNorth American XB-28

Development

 Poland
 Spain
 Soviet Union
  • Soviet Air Force (Voyenno-Vozdushnye Sily or VVS) received a total of 866 B-25s of the C, D, G*, and J series.[43] * trials only (5).
 United Kingdom
 United States
see B-25 Mitchell units of the United States Army Air Forces

Specifications (B-25 Mitchell)

General characteristics

  • Crew: 5 (one pilot, navigator/bombardier, turret gunner/engineer, radio operator/waist gunner, tail gunner)
  • Length: 52 ft 11 in (16.13 m)
  • Wingspan: 67 ft 7 in (20.60 m)
  • Height: 16 ft 4 in (4.98 m)
  • Wing area: 618 sq ft (57.4 m2)
  • Airfoil: root: NACA 23017; tip: NACA 4409R[49]
  • Empty weight: 19,480 lb (8,836 kg)
  • Max takeoff weight: 35,000 lb (15,876 kg)
  • Powerplant: 2 × Wright R-2600-92 Twin Cyclone 14-cylinder two-row air-cooled radial piston engines, 1,700 hp (1,300 kW) each

Performance

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 272 mph (438 km/h, 236 kn) at 13,000 ft (4,000 m)
  • Cruise speed: 230 mph (370 km/h, 200 kn)
  • Range: 1,350 mi (2,170 km, 1,170 nmi)
  • Service ceiling: 24,200 ft (7,400 m)

Armament

  • Guns: 12–18 × .50 in (12.7 mm) machine guns and 75 mm (2.95 in) T13E1 cannon
  • Hardpoints: 2,000 lb (900 kg) ventral shackles to hold one external Mark 13 torpedo[50]
  • Rockets: racks for eight 5 in (127 mm) high velocity aircraft rockets (HVAR)
  • Bombs: 3,000 lb (1,360 kg) bombs

Aircrafttoaal encyclopedia

An air force, also known in some countries as an aerospace force or air army, is in the broadest sense, the national military branch that primarily conducts aerial warfare.