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Grumman /Northrop
E-2C Hawkeye

The Northrop Grumman E-2 Hawkeye is an American all-weather, carrier-capable tactical airborne early warning (AEW) aircraft. This twin-turboprop aircraft was designed and developed during the late 1950s and early 1960s by the Grumman Aircraft Company for the United States Navy as a replacement for the earlier, piston-engined E-1 Tracer, which was rapidly becoming obsolete

Grumman: E-2C Hawkeye

Role Airborne early warning and control
National origin United States
Manufacturer Grumman
Northrop Grumman
First flight 21 October 1960
Introduction January 1964
Status In service
Primary users United States Navy
Produced 1960–present
Number built 313 (total); 88 (E-2D)
Developed into Grumman C-2 Greyhound

Grumman

Northrop Grumman
E-2 Hawkeye

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Grumman E-2C Hawkeye

The Northrop Grumman E-2 Hawkeye is an American all-weather, carrier-capable tactical airborne early warning (AEW) aircraft. This twin-turboprop aircraft was designed and developed during the late 1950s and early 1960s by the Grumman Aircraft Company for the United States Navy as a replacement for the earlier, piston-engined E-1 Tracer, which was rapidly becoming obsolete. The aircraft’s performance has been upgraded with the E-2B and E-2C versions, where most of the changes were made to the radar and radio communications due to advances in electronic integrated circuits and other electronics. The fourth major version of the Hawkeye is the E-2D, which first flew in 2007. The E-2 was the first aircraft designed specifically for its role

Design

W2F-1
Original designation of the Hawkeye, changed to E-2A in 1962.
E-2A
Initial production version, was W2F-1 before 1962. 59 built.[31]
E-2B
As E-2A but fitted with improved computing, enlarged outer fins. 52 converted from E-2A.
E-2C
As the E-2B but with all new electronics, surveillance radar and search radar, 63 built. 
E-2C Hawkeye 2000
New mission computer, 
E-2D
A variant with new avionics suite, improved engines, a new “glass cockpit” 

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Grumman E-2C Hawkeye (1954)

Variants

 

 
F11F-1
Single-seat fighter version for the U.S. Navy, redesignated F-11A in 1962. 199 built and later production aircraft had a longer nose. One was used for static tests with a further production of 231 aircraft cancelled.
F11F-1P
Designation of a Navy photo reconnaissance version, 85 were cancelled.[6]
F11F-1F Super Tiger (G-98J)
F11F-1 fitted with the J79-GE-3A engine, two built.
F11F-1T
Proposed tandem-seat trainer variant; unbuilt.[

Specifications

Crew: 5: pilot, copilot, radar officer (RO), combat information center officer (CICO), aircraft control officer (ACO)

Length: 57 ft 8+34 in (17.596 m)

Wingspan: 80 ft 7 in (24.56 m)

Height: 18 ft 3+34 in (5.582 m) : Radome could retract by 2 feet to fit into the 17′ 6″ 

Empty weight: 40,200 lb (18,234 kg)

Gross weight: 43,068 lb (19,535 kg)

Max takeoff weight: 57,500 lb (26,082 kg)

Powerplant: 2 × Allison/Rolls-Royce T56-A-427 (E-2C), T56-A-427A 

Maximum speed: 350 kn (400 mph, 650 km/h)

Cruise speed: 256 kn (295 mph, 474 km/h)

Ferry range: 1,462 nmi (1,682 mi, 2,708 km)

Endurance: 6 hours (8 hours land-based)[90]

Service ceiling: 34,700 ft (10,600 m)

Wing loading: 72.7 lb/sq ft (355 kg/m2)

Power/mass: 0.19 hp/lb (0.31 kW/kg)

Related development

Aircraft of comparable role, configuration, and era

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Seven U.S. Navy squadrons flew the F11F-1: VF-21 and VF-33 in the Atlantic Fleet and VA-156 (redesignated VF-111 in January 1959), VF-24 (redesignated VF-211 in March 1959), VF-51, VF-121, and VF-191 in the Pacific Fleet.

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