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Republic F-84F Thunderstreak "1950"

The Republic P-47 Thunderbolt is a World War II-era fighter aircraft produced by the American aerospace company Republic Aviation from 1941 through 1945. Its primary armament was eight .50-caliber machine guns, and in the fighter-bomber ground-attack role it could carry five-inch rockets or a bomb load of 2,500 lb (1,100 kg).

Republic F-84F THUNDERstreak "1950"

Role Fighter-bomber/Reconnaissance aircraft
National origin United States
Manufacturer Republic Aviation
First flight June 3, 1950
Introduction May 12, 1954
Retired 1972 (US ANG) / 1991 (Greece)
Primary users United States Air Force / German Air Force
Italian Air Force / Belgian Air Force
Number built 3,428
Developed from Republic F-84 Thunderjet
Variants Republic XF-84H Thunderscreech


Republic

The Republic F-84F Thunderstreak was an American swept-wing turbojet fighter-bomber.

Goto Republic Aircraft

In 1948, a swept wing version of the F-84 was created with the hope of bringing performance to the level of the F-86. The last production F-84E was fitted with a swept tail, a new wing with 38.5 degrees of leading edge sweep and 3.5 degrees of anhedral, and a J35-A-25 engine producing 5,300 pound-force (23.58 kN) of thrust.The aircraft was designated XF-96A. It flew on 3 June 1950 with Otto P. Haas at the controls. Although the airplane was capable of 602 knots (693 mph, 1,115 km/h), the performance gain over the F-84E was considered minor.[1] Nonetheless, it was ordered into production in July 1950 as the F-84F Thunderstreak. The F-84 designation was retained because the fighter was expected to be a low-cost improvement of the straight-wing Thunderjet with over 55 percent commonality in tooling.[1]

Operational History

The Thunderstreak suffered from the same poor takeoff performance as the straight-wing Thunderjet despite having a more powerful engine. In reality, almost 700 pounds-force (3.11 kN) or ten percent of total thrust was lost because the J65 was installed at an angle and its jet pipe was not perfectly straight (in addition to the usual thrust losses from the long jet pipe). On a hot day, 7,500 feet (2,285 m) of runway were required for takeoff roll. A typical takeoff speed was 160 knots (185 mph, 300 km/h). Like the Thunderjet, the Thunderstreak excelled at cruise and had predictable handling characteristics within its performance envelope. Like its predecessor, it also suffered from accelerated stall pitch-up and potential resulting separation of wings from the airplane. In addition, spins in the F-84F were practically unrecoverable and ejection was the only recourse below 10,000 feet (3,000 m)

Operators

 

 Denmark
 France
 Germany
 Greece
 Italy
  • Italian Air Force operated 194 Republic F-84F Thunderstreak and 78 RF-84F Thunderflash from 1956 until 1974
 Netherlands
 Norway
 United States

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Republic F-84 Thunderstreak (1950)

The Thunderstreak suffered from the same poor takeoff performance as the straight-wing Thunderjet despite having a more powerful engine. In reality, almost 700 pounds-force (3.11 kN) or ten percent of total thrust was lost because the J65 was installed at an angle and its jet pipe was not perfectly straight (in addition to the usual thrust losses from the long jet pipe). On a hot day, 7,500 feet (2,285 m) of runway were required for takeoff roll A typical takeoff speed was 160 knots (185 mph, 300 km/h). Like the Thunderjet, the Thunderstreak excelled at cruise and had predictable handling characteristics within its performance envelope. 

Specifications

Crew: 1

Length: 36 ft 1.75 in (11.0173 m)

Wingspan: 40 ft 9 516 in (12.429 m)

Height: 14 ft 8 116 in (4.472 m

Empty weight: 10,000 lb (4,536 kg)

Max takeoff weight: 17,500 lb (7,938 kg)

Powerplant: 1 × Pratt & Whitney R-2800-59 18-cylinder air-cooled radial piston engine, 2,000 hp (1,500 kW)

Performance

Maximum speed: 695 mph (1,119 km/h, 604 kn) at sea level

Range: 810 mi (1,304 km, 704 nmi) combat radius with two droptanks

Service ceiling: 46,000 ft (14,000 m)

Rate of climb: 8,200 ft/min (42 m/s)

Wing loading: 86 lb/sq ft (423 kg/m2

Armament

6× .50 in (12.7 mm) Browning M3 machine guns, four mounted in nose over intake, two mounted in the wing roots, 1,800 rounds total

Up to 6,000lb (2,727 kg) of rockets and bombs,

including one Mark 7 nuclear bomb

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The company was established on 10 December 1939 by the armament company Oerlikon-Bührle, and construction of a new production building started in March 1940. The company was formed to do maintenance and repairs for the Swiss Air Force, the first work of the new company was assembly of EKW C-35 reconnaissance biplanes from spare parts, and overhaul work on other types

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