The Travel Air 2000/3000/4000 (originally, the Model A, Model B and Model BH
were open-cockpit biplane aircraft produced in the United States

Travel Air 2000 Series
"1925"

Rolebiplane aircraft
ManufacturerTravel Air, Curtiss-Wright
DesignerLloyd Stearman
First flight13 March 1925
Introduction1925
Statusretired
Primary userprivate owners, aerial sightseeing businesses
Produced1925–1930
Number builtapprox 1,300




Curtiss Aircraft

Travel Air 2000 Series
"1925"

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Travel Air 2000 Series
"1925"

The Travel Air 2000/3000/4000 (originally, the Model A, Model B and Model BH[1] were open-cockpit biplane aircraft produced in the United States in the late 1920s by the Travel Air Manufacturing Company. During the period from 1924–1929, Travel Air produced more aircraft than any other American manufacturer, including over 1,000 biplanes. While an exact number is almost impossible to ascertain due to the number of conversions and rebuilds, some estimates for Travel Air as a whole range from 1,200 to nearly 2,000 aircraf

Operational history

The Travel Air Model A was engineered chiefly by Lloyd Stearman, with input from Travel Air co-founders Walter Beech, Clyde Cessna, and Bill Snook and could trace its ancestry back to the Swallow New Swallow biplane. The Travel Air, however, replaced the New Swallow’s wooden fuselage structure with a welded steel tube. An interim design, the Winstead Special, was developed by the Winstead brothers from a metal fuselage frame developed at Swallow by Stearman and Walter Beech, but subsequently rejected by Swallow president Jake Moellendick, a decision which triggered the departure of both Stearman and Beech, and the creation of Travel Air.[2][3] Until the appearance of the all new 12/14/16 series, all subsequent Travel Air biplanes would be derived from the Model A

Date from Aerofiles
Curtiss OX-5-powered Travel Air 2000 at the Historic Aircraft Restoration Museum, Dauster Field, Creve Coeur, Missouri
Travel Air 3000
Travel Air 4000 at Fantasy of Flight.
Travel Air E-4000
Early Letter Designations

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Travel Air Type 2000 "1925"

Travel Air biplanes were widely used in 1920s/1930s war movies, particularly to represent the airplanes they were patterned after: Germany’s Fokker D-VII fighter, the top fighter of World War I. In the motion picture industry, they were known as “Wichita Fokkers.” In fact, Hollywood’s demand for Travel Air biplanes was so intense that Travel Air’s California salesman, Fred Hoyt, coaxed Travel Air co-founder and principal airplane designer, Lloyd Stearman, to come to Venice, California in 1926 to exploit the movie industry demand for his aircraft by starting the short-lived independent Stearman Aircraft Company (re-opened back in Wichita in 1927)

Specifications

  • Crew: One
  • Capacity: Two passengers
  • Length: 24 ft 2 in (7.37 m)
  • Upper wingspan: 34 ft 8 in (10.57 m)
  • Lower wingspan: 28 ft 8 in (8.74 m)
  • Height: 8 ft 11 in (2.72 m)
  • Empty weight: 1,335 lb (606 kg)
  • Useful load: 845 lb (383 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Curtiss OX-5 water-cooled V8 engine, 90 hp (67 kW) 

Maximum speed: 100 mph (160 km/h, 87 kn)

Cruise speed: 85 mph (137 km/h, 74 kn)

Minimum control speed: 40 mph (64 km/h, 35 kn)

Range: 425 mi (684 km, 369 nmi)

Service ceiling: 10,000 ft (3,000 m) no load

Rate of climb: 550 ft/min (2.8 m/s)

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The Travel Air 2000/3000/4000 (originally, the Model A, Model B and Model BH
were open-cockpit biplane aircraft produced in the United States