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AICHI D3A TYPE 99 CARRIER BOMBER

The B-36 was under development in 1941 and first flew on August 8, 1946. The first operational models were delivered to SAC in 1948, but due to early problems the B-36 units were not fully operational until 1951. The B-36 cost $3.6 million each. It had a 3,740-nm combat radius with a 10,000-pound payload, or a 1,757-nm radius with a maximum bomb load of 86,000 pounds. The last B-36 was built in August 1954, for a total production of 388 aircraft. The B-36 force was modernized with the advent of the long range B-52. On 29 June 1955 the first B-52 was delivered to SAC. At that time there were 340 of the B-36s assigned

AICHI D3A TYPE 99
CARRIER BOMBER

Role Carrier-based dive bomber
Manufacturer Aichi Kokuki KK
First flight January 1938
Introduction 1940
Retired 1945
Primary user Imperial Japanese Navy
Number built 1,495 (479 D3A1) / (1016 D3A2)
Developed into Yokosuka D3Y Myōjo

Aichi D3A Type 99 Val

Vultee V-1 1933 25 /  / ultee V-11 1935 175-224
Vultee V-12 1939 / V-54, Vultee BT-13 Valiant 1939
V-48, Vultee P-66 Vanguard 1939 / Vultee V-72 Vengeance 1941 1,931
Vultee V-84 1943 2 Prototype / V-90, Vultee XA-41 1944 1 Prototype
Consolidated TBY Sea Wolf 1944 180 / Vultee XP-68 Tornado n/a 0


Vultee Consolidated (Convair)

The Aichi D3A Type 99 Carrier Bomber (Allied reporting name "Val") is a World War II carrier-borne dive bomber

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The Aichi D3A Type 99 Carrier Bomber (Allied reporting nameVal“) is a World War II carrier-borne dive bomber. It was the primary dive bomber of the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) and was involved in almost all IJN actions, including the attack on Pearl Harbor.

Design and development

In mid-1936, the Japanese Navy issued the 11-Shi specification for a monoplane carrier-based dive bomber to replace the existing D1A biplane then in service.[1] Aichi, Nakajima, and Mitsubishi all submitted designs, with the former two subsequently being asked for two prototypes each.

The Aichi design started with low-mounted elliptical wings inspired by the Heinkel He 70 Blitz. It flew slowly enough that the drag from the landing gear was not a serious issue, so fixed gear was used for simplicity.[6] The aircraft was to be powered by the 529 kW (709 hp) Nakajima Hikari 1 nine-cylinder radial engine.

Operators

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Aichi D3A Val (1940)

The Aichi D3A Type 99 Carrier Bomber (Allied reporting name “Val“) is a World War II carrier-borne dive bomber. It was the primary dive bomber of the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) and was involved in almost all IJN actions, including the attack on Pearl Harbor.

The Aichi D3A was the first Japanese aircraft to bomb American targets in the war, commencing with Pearl Harbor and U.S. bases in the Philippines, such as Clark Air Force Base. They sank more Allied warships than any other Axis aircraft.[3][4][5]

Specifications

General characteristics

  • Crew: 2
  • Length: 10.195 m (33 ft 5 in)
  • Wingspan: 14.365 m (47 ft 2 in)
  • Height: 3.847 m (12 ft 7 in)
  • Empty weight: 2,570 kg (5,666 lb) / D3A1: 2,408 kg (5,309 lb)
  • Gross weight: 3,800 kg (8,378 lb) / D3A1: 3,650 kg (8,050 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Mitsubishi Kinsei 54 14-cylinder air-cooled radial piston engine, 970 kW (1,300 hp) for take-off
  • Performance

    • Maximum speed: 430 km/h (270 mph, 230 kn) at 6,200 m (20,300 ft)
      D3A1: 387 km/h (240 mph; 209 kn) at 3,000 m (9,800 ft)
    • Cruise speed: 296 km/h (184 mph, 160 kn) at 3,000 m (9,800 ft)
    • Range: 1,352 km (840 mi, 730 nmi) D3A1: 1,472 km (915 mi)
    • Service ceiling: 10,500 m (34,400 ft) D3A1: 9,300 m (30,500 ft)
    • Time to altitude: 3,000 m (9,800 ft) in 5 minutes 48 seconds
  • Armament

    • Guns: 2x forward-firing 7.7 mm (0.303 in) Type 97 aircraft machine guns in the forward fuselage upper decking + 1x 7.7 mm (0.303 in) Type 92 machine gun on a flexible mount in the rear cockpit
    • Bombs: 1x 250 kg (550 lb) under the fuselage and 2x 60 kg (130 lb) bombs under the wing

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