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VULTEE
XP-54 SWOOSE GOOSE

Flight tests of the first prototype, 41-1210, began on 15 January 1943. Trials showed performance to be substantially below guarantees. Simultaneously, development of the XH-2470 engine was discontinued. Although the Allison V-3420 engine could be substituted, that required substantial airframe changes. Projected delay and costs resulted in a decision to not consider production buys.

Vultee XP-54 Swoose Goose

Role Fighter
National origin United States
Manufacturer Vultee Aircraft
First flight 15 January 1943
Status Canceled
Primary user United States Army Air Forces
Number built 2
Variants XP-68 Tornado

Vultee XP-54 Swoose Goose

Vultee V-1 1933 25 /  / ultee V-11 1935 175-224
Vultee V-12 1939 / V-54, Vultee BT-13 Valiant 1939
V-48, Vultee P-66 Vanguard 1939 / Vultee V-72 Vengeance 1941 1,931
Vultee V-84 1943 2 Prototype / V-90, Vultee XA-41 1944 1 Prototype
Consolidated TBY Sea Wolf 1944 180 / Vultee XP-68 Tornado n/a 0


Vultee Consolidated (Convair)

The Vultee XP-54 Swoose Goose was a prototype fighter built by the Vultee Aircraft Company for the United States Army Air Forces (USAAF).

Goto Vultee Aircraft

The Vultee XP-54 Swoose Goose was a prototype fighter built by the Vultee Aircraft Company for the United States Army Air Forces (USAAF).

Design and development

Vultee submitted a proposal in response to a U.S. Army Air Corps request for an unusual configuration. The Vultee design won the competition, beating the Curtiss XP-55 Ascender and the Northrop XP-56 Black Bullet. Vultee designated it Model 84, a descendant of their earlier Model 78. After completing preliminary engineering and wind tunnel tests, a contract for a prototype was awarded on 8 January 1941. A second prototype was ordered on 17 March 1942. Although it appeared to be a radical design, performance was lackluster, and the project was canceled.

Operational history

Operational history
Flight tests of the first prototype, 41-1210, began on 15 January 1943. Trials showed performance to be substantially below guarantees. Simultaneously, development of the XH-2470 engine was discontinued. Although the Allison V-3420 engine could be substituted, that required substantial airframe changes. Projected delay and costs resulted in a decision to not consider production buys.

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Vultee Swoose Goose (1961)

The XP-54 was designed with a pusher engine in the aft part of the fuselage. The tail was mounted rearward between two mid-wing booms, with the twelve-foot propeller between them. The design included a “ducted wing section” developed by the NACA to potentially enable installation of cooling radiators and intercoolers in the inverted gull wing. The Pratt & Whitney X-1800 engine was proposed as the powerplant, but after its development, was discontinued. The liquid-cooled Lycoming XH-2470 was substituted

Specifications

General characteristics

  • Crew: one, pilot
  • Length: 54 ft 9 in (16.69 m)
  • Wingspan: 53 ft 10 in (16.41 m)
  • Height: 14 ft 6 in (4.42 m)
  • Empty weight: 15,262 lb (6,923 kg)
  • Gross weight: 18,233 lb (8,270 kg)
  • Max takeoff weight: 19,337 lb (8,771 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Lycoming XH-2470-1 liquid-cooled piston engine, 
  • Performance

    • Maximum speed: 381 mph (613 km/h, 331 kn) at 28,500 ft (8,700 m)
    • Range: 500 mi (805 km, 430 nmi)
    • Service ceiling: 37,000 ft (11,300 m)
    • Rate of climb: 2,300 ft/min (11.7 m/s)
    • Wing loading: 40 lb/sq ft (196 kg/m2)
    • Power/mass: 0.13 hp/lb (0.20 kW/kg)

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Aircrafttotaal

The XP-54 was designed with a pusher engine in the aft part of the fuselage. The tail was mounted rearward between two mid-wing booms, with the twelve-foot propeller between them. The design included a "ducted wing section" developed by the NACA to potentially enable installation of cooling radiators and intercoolers in the inverted gull wing. The Pratt & Whitney X-1800 engine was proposed as the powerplant, but after its development, was discontinued. The liquid-cooled Lycoming XH-2470 was substituted

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